#TBT Book Review – House of Many Ways by Diana Wynne Jones

House of Many Ways by Diana Wynne JonesHouse of Many Ways

written by Diana Wynne Jones
Greenwillow Books, 2008

Despite her family’s background in magic, her mother (who does not possess magic skills) sheltered Charmain from the arts her whole life. Now Charmain is caring for her relative; dealing with a special, stray dog and a slow wizard apprentice; and trying to learn the regular household duties to get along. Somehow, in helping at the Royal Library she get entangled in web involving the magical royal family. What seemed to be a simple task of house-sitting turns out to be far more complex than Charmain thought.

Reading Tub review of House of Many Ways: June 2009


Why a Throwback Thursday for Book Reviews?

Those of us who blog about books are a community. We read lots of books, we write lots of reviews, and we share those reviews with fellow book lovers and those in search of books for children and teens on our blogs, websites, and via social media.

We write so many reviews that, over time, they get buried by other, newer reviews. BUT! that book we read three years ago will always be new to some reader, somewhere. So why not share that review with a new audience?

Everyone is welcome! Here are the participation guidelines:

  • If you reviewed the same book we’re featuring, add your permalink to the original review on the Reading Tub website or in the InLinkz Linkup.
  • Want to (re)share a review you posted in June 2009, then add your permalink in the InLinkz Linkup. [No, it doesn’t have to be a book you loved; but it does have to be a review you take a lot of pride in.]
  • Add any notes about the review in the comments, please.

The spammers have been having a blast with our Throwback Thursday posts … now its your turn to take back blogging from those nuiscances.  Did you review House of Many Ways by Diana Wynne Jones? Or another book from June 2009? Add it to our linkup above or comments below.

NOTES: House of Many Ways cover image links to amazon.com. The Reading Tub has an affiliate relationship with Amazon.

#TBT Book Review – Blue Goose by Nancy Tafuri

Blue Goose by Nancy Tafuri is a book that a Reading Tub volunteer introduced to us. She and her daughter (then 5 and 6) would make weekly trips to their local library, and we were the beneficiaries of some of her daughter’s favorite choices. I always loved opening her emails because every review came with a personal story about their library visit.

Blue Goose by Nancy TafuriBlue Goose

written and illustrated by Nancy Tafuri
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2008

Farmer Gray drives off in his truck to go to town. While he is gone, the animals paint the farm in all the primary colors: a Blue Goose, a Red Hen, a Yellow Chick, and a White Duck.

They mix their colors to make other colors and the farm is done just in time for Farmer Gray’s return. This is a humorous presentation of colors.

Reading Tub review date for Blue Goose: April 2008


The spammers have been having a blast with our Throwback Thursday posts … but I’m hoping that as time goes on, the Kidlit blogging community will share some of their favorite “old” reviews, too. Did you review Blue Goose? Or another book from April 2008? Add it to our linkup or in the comments below!

Why a Throwback Thursday for Book Reviews?

Those of us who blog about books are a community. We read lots of books, we write lots of reviews, and we share those reviews with fellow book lovers and those in search of books for children and teens on our blogs, websites, and via social media.

We write so many reviews that, over time, they get buried by other, newer reviews. BUT! that book we read three years ago will always be new to some reader, somewhere. So why not share that review with a new audience?

Everyone is welcome! Here are the participation guidelines:

  • If you reviewed the same book we’re featuring, add your permalink to the original review on the Reading Tub website or in the InLinkz Linkup.
  • Want to (re)share a review you posted in June 2009, then add your permalink in the InLinkz Linkup. [No, it doesn’t have to be a book you loved; but it does have to be a review you take a lot of pride in.]
  • Add any notes about the review in the comments, please.

 

Notes: Blue Goose cover image links to amazon.com. The Reading Tub has an affiliate relationship with Amazon.

Book Reports – Literacy + Life for Summer

book reportsSome of my favorite memories of summer come from visits to the library. It was the time of year for fun, leisure, pick-my-own books reading. It was also the time for book reports.

You see, my dad was a teacher, so in our house we had to read 10 (age appropriate) books over the summer … and write a book report for each one. Yes, write – pen to paper! There weren’t any other options.

I liked to write, so it wasn’t a big deal. For my brothers, though, it was torture. I often wonder if they were kids now, would it be the same way? There is great value in hand writing a report. BUT if there had been a way to create book reports that were more fun, would they have liked reading better?

Would they have actively looked for books that let them create the kind of book reports they liked?

Why do we even need Book Reports?

I didn’t know it at the time, but there was a method to my dad’s “madness.” The requirement to read books (of our choosing) was a way to keep our reading skills in tact (i.e., avoid the summer slide). Writing those book reports was more than just ‘proof’ that we read the book.

  • It showed our comprehension – did we ‘get’ the story?
  • We practiced sequencing – did we put the story’s events in the right order?
  • It gave us a chance to practice writing in all its forms – small motor skills, grammar & punctuation, etc.

3 Ideas for Creating Book Reports

Thanks to technology (more specifically hand-held technology) there are lots of unique, engaging ways to accomplish the goals of creating book reports without ye olde drudgery.

Each of these ideas can be done with traditional writing (or typing) or using technology (video, photography, podcasting, online tools).

1. Create a letter. Let your reader compose a letter to one of the book’s characters. Starter ideas …

  • talk about things they share in common;
  • Explain why “x” choice wasn’t a good one;
  • ask questions about the character, events, or places from the book.

2. Script a newscast. Let your reader be a news reporter.

  • They might create a “live from ___” to do an on-scene report related to an event in the book.
  • They could give you a list of questions so that you can interview them about an event (with them in role as a story character).
  • They could present the report as an ‘infomercial.’

3. Draw a comic of the story. It could be as simple as a scene from the book, three or five frames, or more sophisticated like a graphic novel.

Illustrated book reports are particularly great for developing readers because they need to ‘describe’ their drawing to you.

Your turn …

What are some of the creative book reports that you’ve seen or encouraged kids to create? Do you have a favorite tool?