About Terry Doherty

I created the Reading Tub to help families find great books to share with their kids. In the process, I found a way to bridge the gap that gets books to readers in need. Hope you'll visit often and join our discussion of literacy, reading, and books.

Reading Tub Recommendations – Just in Time for Summer

Things have been a wee bit quiet around The Reading Tub these past few months. I *would* feel guilty, except that we have been reading up a storm and working on a H-U-G-E project. Now it is time to launch our project … Reading Tub Recommendations! RTR is a newsletter where subscribers tell us the age of their child and what kinds of books their child likes to hear/read and we send them a read-tested book recommendation. It is more than just a newsletter, though. Reading Tub Recommendations is a guide for parents and caregivers trying to find that “it” book. The one that turns their struggling or resistant child into a reader and (maybe) a bookworm. The right book … Read more

UPDATED: What is dyslexia? – Kelli Sandman-Hurley

I don’t often paste in content from other sources for Family Bookshelf, but understanding dyslexia is important, and this Infographic is a great way to see just what happens when our brains process information! Dyslexia affects up to 1 in 5 people, but the experience of dyslexia isn’t always the same. This difficulty in processing language exists along a spectrum — one that doesn’t necessarily fit with labels like “normal” and “defective.” Kelli Sandman-Hurley urges us to think again about dyslexic brain function and to celebrate the neurodiversity of the human brain. ~ Terry   See on Scoop.it – Family Literacy See on ed.ted.com

Screens & Screen Time: a Precarious Balance (Soapbox Series #10)

The Soapbox Series is a periodic post that allows me to vent, share, or comment on ideas, experiences, and topics that may or may not relate to the literacy and reading mission of the blog. When I was a girl, there was only one kind of screen: television. It was for spending our leisure time. It gave us a window to “outside worlds,” the ones beyond our neighborhood. Most of the time it was turned off, and we were outside, or playing games, or reading, or drawing … finding other ways to fill our days. Now screens are a “necessary” part of our daily lives and those of our children. We’re using or “on” our screens almost nonstop. Just as … Read more