#TBT Book Review – The Magic Thief by Sarah Prineas

First a confession: Sarah Prineas had me at “Conn.” Can you think of a better name for a thief?

The Magic Thief trilogy is one of my go-to recommendations for readers. First you get invested in the characters quickly (see above!). Then you come along for all the adventure and wanting to know “what’s next.” It has that magical boy wizard feel, without the heaviness and denser, more complex text some readers don’t enjoy or aren’t quite ready to tackle.

This week we’re doing something a bit different. We’re not linking back to one book, but three. So if you reviewed any (or all) of the books in The Magic Thief trilogy, share them!

magic thief by sarah prineasThe Magic Thief (trilogy)

written by Sarah Prineas
HarperCollins Publishers

Conn is a thief who picks pockets and locks. The day he decides to pick Nevery’s pocket, his life changes forever. Nevery is a wizard and Conn has lifted a magic stone. The stone should have killed him, but it doesn’t. Nevery decides to bring Conn home, making him a servant. Conn is now saved from a life on the street … but how safe is the city?

In Lost (Book 2), Conn’s experiments to recontact the magic totally destroyed Heartsease, the home of Nevery Flinglas, his mentor. His hopes for returning to the academy have been dashed, and he has been exiled. Still, he can sense the magic is trying to tell him something. Wellmet is again in danger, and the presence of quicksilver from Desh is a clue.

Found (Book 3) begins with great fear Arhionvar, the dread magic, is coming. Why can’t the magisters see that? Because he is still banished from Wellmet, it is not easy for Conn to communicate with Nevery; still, they find a way to make their plans to protect the city. First, Conn must find a new locus magicalus. His search takes him deep into a dragon’s cave and reveals truths that may ultimately save Wellmet, but at what cost?

Reading Tub Reviews
The Magic Thief (Book 1) – June 2008
Lost (Book 2) – February 2009
Found (Book 3) – June 2010


Why a Throwback Thursday for Book Reviews?

Those of us who blog about books are a community. We read lots of books, we write lots of reviews, and we share those reviews with fellow book lovers and those in search of books for children and teens on our blogs, websites, and via social media.

We write so many reviews that, over time, they get buried by other, newer reviews. BUT! that book we read three years ago will always be new to some reader, somewhere. So why not share that review with a new audience?

Everyone is welcome! Here are the participation guidelines:

  • If you reviewed the same book we’re featuring, add your permalink to the original review on the Reading Tub website or in the InLinkz Linkup.
  • Want to (re)share a review you posted in June 2009, then add your permalink in the InLinkz Linkup. [No, it doesn’t have to be a book you loved; but it does have to be a review you take a lot of pride in.]
  • Add any notes about the review in the comments, please.

 

#TBT Book Review – Duck! Rabbit! by Amy

Duck! Rabbit! Books that play with words are among my favorites. Picture books, in particular, are fun because they add visual interest (and usually extra laughter). It is hard to believe that it has been six years since we read and reviewed Amy Krouse Rosenthal’s Duck! Rabbit!

How about you? When did you read Duck! Rabbit! … and did you write a review? Share your link below in this week’s #TBT BOok

Duck! Rabbit! by Amy Krouse RosenthalDuck! Rabbit!

written by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld

It is a simple image, or so it seems. One narrator says it’s a duck. The other says it’s a rabbit. Can it be both?

This is a book that demonstrates that one thing can be interpreted different ways.

Reading Tub review: June 2009
Click to read our full review of Duck! Rabbit!

Why a Throwback Thursday for Book Reviews?

Those of us who blog about books are a community. We read lots of books, we write lots of reviews, and we share those reviews with fellow book lovers and those in search of books for children and teens on our blogs, websites, and via social media.

We write so many reviews that, over time, they get buried by other, newer reviews. BUT! that book we read three years ago will always be new to some reader, somewhere. So why not share that review with a new audience?

Everyone is welcome! Here are the participation guidelines:

  • If you reviewed the same book we’re featuring, add your permalink to the original review on the Reading Tub website or in the InLinkz Linkup.
  • Want to (re)share a review you posted in June 2009, then add your permalink in the InLinkz Linkup. [No, it doesn’t have to be a book you loved; but it does have to be a review you take a lot of pride in.]
  • Add any notes about the review in the comments, please.

Notes: Duck! Rabbit! cover image links to Amazon.com. The Reading Tub has an affiliate relationship with Amazon.

Literacy + Life: Summer Road Trip edition

Yeah! Summer is here … time for that summer road trip!

summer road trip
Whether you’re headed to the mountains or the ocean, we’d like to invite you to take our new Literacy Road Trip eBook with you.

  • The kids get some fun, educational car games for your summer road trip.
  • You get something to keep them busy and ward off the  pleas of are we there yet?

Literacy Road Trip; Games to Make Car Travel Fun (and Educational) is part of our Literacy + Life series. It is a set of ready-made games that engage kids with literacy concepts. Download the book, print the game cards … and you’re ready to roll! Perfect for your summer road trip!

literacy games for kids

There are limitless ways to play Literacy Road Trip! The games can played as a solitary activity or with backseat companions. They are also adaptable for children of different ages.

  • For emerging readers [ages 2 to 5], you might focus on finding signs and objects based on color and/or shape.
  • With developing and independent readers [ages 6 and Up], you can add elements like reading the sign or spelling the word(s) associated with the sign.

Two, printable versions are included with this e-Book.

The Matching | Bingo edition is a set of “bingo” style game cards with five symbols on each card. Players “match” what they see from their seat with what is on their card. The cards are designed for game variety (e.g., objects, shapes, colors).

Our Playing Card edition is designed so you can use the sheet as a 6-piece game card OR cut the images into a deck of playing cards. The Playing Card edition also includes cards that are annotated with descriptive words, as well as cards with no words at all. This adds additional ways to play the game, and can help young readers connect words they “see” in a picture with the written text.

Get Ready for your Summer Road Trip

The Literacy Road Trip! is a free, downloadable product created by Terry Doherty of The Reading Tub. It contains two pages of instruction and game-play ideas, and two sets of game cards.

summer road trip game book

When you click Get my copy you’ll be asked to fill out a short, non-identifying form about your child’s reading interests, and an opportunity to sign up for The Reading Tub’s newsletter.

Literacy Road Trip; Games to Make Car Travel Fun (and Educational) is licensed under a Creative Commons International License and can be shared and reproduced, with attribution.