Character Counts! A Writer’s Perspective by Fiona Ingram

Several years ago, (then) debut South African author Fiona Ingram asked us to read her new book: The Secret of the Sacred Scarab. It was the first book in a middle grade adventure series that is part India Jones, part Spy Kids. Earlier this year, Fiona published the second title, The Search for the Sword of Excalibur. Over the years we’ve kept in touch. In talking about an author’s journey, we had a wonderful conversation about how authors build their characters. We also talked about “author character” – the impact a reviewer’s comments can have on how a writer approaches his/her work. I found Fiona’s experiences and perspective not just interesting, but valuable. I invited her to build on the concepts of … Read more

Can you taste it? a 5 Senses Poem – Yum!

Next up in my poetic journey is a 5 senses poem I wrote about friendship. As you would expect, with a 5 senses poem, each line draws on one of our five senses – taste touch smell sight sound In her explanation of 5 senses poems at the Make and Take blog, colors can make great sensory poetry, too. Friendship – a 5 Senses Poem Friendship is a spring color It smells like a rose And tastes like apple pie friendship sounds like a songbird And feels like a furry white kitten. If I were writing a 5 senses poem about friendship today, it would be … Friendship is iridescent It smells like cinnamon With a taste of hot cocoa … Read more

Septone – a Throwback Thursday for National Poetry Month

To all my poetry friends and friends who are poets: I confess, I did not remember what a septone poem is. Here is a great definition I found at Mr. Kelly’s Place, a Weebly blog by an Ontario, Canada, educator. A Septone poem consists of 7 lines of simple, just-for-fun, unrhymed verse. Authors commonly use their 7 digit home or cellular phone number (no area codes required) as the digits in the phone number help to establish the number of syllables the author will use per line (assume that zero requires ten syllables). There is no set topics with Septones and students are encouraged to create a story with a beginning, middle and end.  Because of the limited lines and syllables, the author has to … Read more